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Date: 1773

"The two great movements of the soul, which the molder of our frames has placed in them for the incitement of virtue and the prevention of vice, are the desire of honour, and the fear of shame: but the perversion of these qualities, which the refinement of society is peculiarly unhappy in making,...

— Mackenzie, Henry (1745-1831)

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Date: 1773

"For some time, the whirling of his brain gave him no leisure to exercise any faculty that could be termed thinking; when that sort of delirium subsided, it left him only to make room for more exquisite, though less turbulent, anguish."

— Mackenzie, Henry (1745-1831)

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Date: 1773

"After having weathered so many successive disasters, I am at last arrived near the place of my nativity; fain would I hope, that a parent and a sister, whose tender remembrance, mingled with that of happier days, now rushes on my soul, are yet alive to pardon the wanderings of my youth, and rece...

— Mackenzie, Henry (1745-1831)

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Date: 1773

"Not but that there moved something unusual in the bosom of Harriet, from the declaration of her lover, and in his, from the attempt which Providence had interposed to disappoint; he consoled himself, however, with the reflexion, that he had not gone such a length as to alarm her simplicity, and ...

— Mackenzie, Henry (1745-1831)

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Date: 1773

"His sister, whose gentle heart began to droop under the thoughts of their separation, he employed every argument to comfort."

— Mackenzie, Henry (1745-1831)

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Date: 1773

"The flattering language of his letters could not arrest the progress of that time, which must divulge the shame of her he had undone; but they soothed the tumults of a soul to whom his villany was yet unknown, and whose affections his appearance of worth, of friendship, and nobleness of mind, ha...

— Mackenzie, Henry (1745-1831)

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Date: 1774

"Imagination is still more inventive in all its other operations. It can lead us from a perception that is present, to the view of many more, and carry us through extensive, distant, and untrodden fields of thought. It can dart in an instant, from earth to heaven, and from heaven to earth; it can...

— Gerard, Alexander (1728-1795)

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Date: 1774

"No sooner almost is a design formed, or the hint of a subject started, than all the ideas which are requisite for compleating it, rush into his view as if they were conjured up by the force of magic."

— Gerard, Alexander (1728-1795)

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Date: 1774

"These latter have only one tie, but the former have a double relation, and will therefore rush into the thoughts with double violence."

— Gerard, Alexander (1728-1795)

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Date: 1774

"No sooner does the imagination, in a moment of wandering, suggest any idea not conducive to the design, than the conception of this design breaks in of its own accord, and, like an antagonist muscle, counteracting the other association, draws us off to the view of a more proper idea."

— Gerard, Alexander (1728-1795)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.