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Date: 1603

A people may be "muddied, / Thick and unwholesome in their thoughts and whispers / For good Polonius' death."

— Shakespeare, William (1564-1616)

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Date: 1603

"Thus conscience does make cowards of us all, / And thus the native hue of resolution / Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought, / And enterprises of great pith and moment / With this regard their currents turn awry, / And lose the name of action."

— Shakespeare, William (1564-1616)

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Date: 1607

"To quench thy learned thirst I meant to draine / The Hippocrenian Fountaine of my braine."

— Walkington, Thomas (b. c. 1575, d. 1621)

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Date: 1609

"My mind is troubled, like a fountain stirr'd;/ And I myself see not the bottom of it."

— Shakespeare, William (1564-1616)

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Date: 1610

Souls may "by our first touch, take in / The poisonous tincture of original sin"

— Donne, John (1572-1631)

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Date: w. 1610-11, 1623

"A solemn air, and the best comforter / To an unsettled fancy, cure thy brains, / Now useless, boiled within thy skull."

— Shakespeare, William (1564-1616)

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Date: w. 1610-11, 1623

"Their understanding / Begins to swell, and the approaching tide / Will shortly fill the reasonable shores / That now lie foul and muddy."

— Shakespeare, William (1564-1616)

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Date: w. c. 150?, 1611

"This second epistle, beloved, I now write unto you; in both which I stir up your pure minds by way of remembrance: That ye may be mindful of the words which were spoken before by the holy prophets, and of the commandment of us the apostles of the Lord and Saviour."

— Simon Peter or Saint Peter (d. c. 64)

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Date: 1612-3, 1623

"I know you have a gentle, noble temper,/ A soul as even as a calm."

— Shakespeare, William (1564-1616)

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Date: 1615

"Go too then, is not he said to know himself, who can tell how to temper and order the state and condition of his mind, how to appease those civil tumults within himself, by the storms and waves whereof he is pitifully tossed, and how to suppress and appease those varieties of passions wherewith ...

— Crooke, Helkiah (1576-1648)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.