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Date: Wednesday, April 30, 1712

"Lace and Drapery is as much a Man, as Wit and Turn is Passion."

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: Thursday, May 15, 1712

"It is extremely natural for us to desire to see such our Thoughts put into the Dress of Words, without which indeed we can scarce have a clear and distinct Idea of them our selves: When they are thus clothed in Expressions, nothing so truly shews us whether they are just or false, as those Effec...

— Budgell, Eustace (1686-1737)

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Date: Friday, May 30, 1712

"To turn the Discourse, which from being witty grew to be malicious, the Matron of the Family took occasion, from the Subject, to wish that there were to be found amongst Men such faithful Monitors to dress the Mind by, as we consult to adorn the Body."

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: 1716

"We are gratify'd to see an unexpected Idea presented to our Understanding, and wonder at the beautiful Conjunction of Notions so separate and remote before; and whatever is marvellous is delightful too; as we always feel a Pleasure at the sight of Foreigners and their Garments, so the Mind rejoi...

— Blackmore, Sir Richard (1654-1729)

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Date: 1718

"Tropes at first, in the rude Times of the World, us'd for Necessity, were soon found to be Ornamental, and to give Strength and Gracefulness to the Turn of Men's Thoughts: As Garments first put on for the necessary Defence of the Body against the Severities of the Weather, were quickly f...

— Blackwall, Anthony (bap. 1672, d. 1730)

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Date: Friday, April 17. 1724

"Their Imaginations are thin, and delicate; and play lightly on the Skirts of Objects: But they are too weak for solid Reasoning; and, in any Thing abstracted, and above the Pitch of the Senses, they are miserably Impotent, and grow presently weary."

— Hill, Aaron (1685-1750)

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Date: 1737

"So many things freely thrown out, such lengths of unreserv'd friendship, thoughts just warm from the brain, without any polishing or dress, the very dishabille of the understanding."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: 1744

"As the body is said to clothe the soul, so the nerves may be said to constitute her inner garment."

— Berkeley, George (1685-1753)

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Date: 1745

"The Ideas must be cloathed in a bodily Form, to make it visible and palpable to the gross Understanding."

— Fordyce, David (bap. 1711, d. 1751)

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Date: 1748, 1754

"He, therefore, who is provided with such Armour, taken, if we may say so, from the Armory of Heaven, may be proof against the sharpest Arrows of Fortune, and defy the Impotence of human Malice; and though he cannot be secure against those Ills which are the ordinary Appendages of Man's Lot, yet ...

— Fordyce, David (bap. 1711, d. 1751)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.