page 2 of 17     per page:
sorted by:

Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Whence comes that vast store, which the busy and boundless Fancy of Man has painted on it, with an almost endless variety?"

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"This is Memory, which is as it were the Store-house of our Ideas."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"For the narrow Mind of Man, not being capable of having many Ideas under View and Consideration at once, it was necessary to have a Repository, to lay up those Ideas, which at another time it might have use of."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"The present pleasure, if it be not very languid, and almost none at all, fills our narrow souls, and so takes up the whole mind, that it scarce leaves any thought of things absent."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"If therefore we will warily attend to the Motions of the Mind, and observe what Course it usually takes in its way to Knowledge, we shall, I think, find that the Mind having got any Idea, which it thinks it may have use of, either in Contemplation or Discourse; the first Thing it does, is to abs...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"These, when we have taken a full survey of them, and their several modes, and the Compositions made out of them, we shall find to contain all our whole stock of Ideas; and that we have nothing in our Minds, which did not come in, one of these two ways."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Let any one examine his own Thoughts, and throughly search into his Understanding, and then let him tell me, Whether all the original Ideas he has there, are any other than of the Objects of his Senses, or of the Operations of his Mind, considered as Objects of his Reflection: and how great a ma...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"I see no Reason therefore to believe, that the Soul thinks before the Senses have furnished it with Ideas to think on; and as those are increased, and retained; so it comes, by Exercise, to improve its Faculty of thinking in the several parts of it, as well as afterwards, by compounding those Id...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Whereby the increase brought into the Stock of real Knowledge has been very little, in proportion to the Schools, Disputes, and Writings, the World has been fill'd with; whilst Men, being lost in the great Wood of Words, knew not whereabout they were, how far their Discoveries were advanced, or ...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"The senses at first let in particular Ideas, and furnish the yet empty Cabinet: And the Mind by degrees growing familiar with some of them, they are lodged in the Memory, and Names got to them."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.