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Date: 1775

"What numbers censure, but how few judge right, / On subjects, which demand the soul's keen sight"

— Downman, Hugh (1740-1809)

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Date: 1775

"[T]here may be a farther difference in the constitution of the nerves belonging to the different senses, or there may be so many circumstances that affect or modify their vibrations, that they may be as distinguishable from one another, as different human voices sounding the same note; and proba...

— Priestley, Joseph (1733-1804)

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Date: 1775

"To lessen this difficulty a little, let it be considered how exceedingly different, to the eye of the mind, as we may say, are our ideas of sensible things from any thing that could have been conjectured concerning their effect upon us."

— Priestley, Joseph (1733-1804)

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Date: 1775

The imagination in its fullest enjoyments becomes suspicious of its offspring, and doubts whether it has created or adopted

— Sheridan, Richard Brinsley (1751-1816)

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Date: 1775

"If there be but one vicious mind in the Set, 'twill spread like a contagion--the action of their pulse beats to the lascivious movement of the jigg--their quivering, warm-breath'd sighs impregnate the very air--the atmosphere becomes electrical to love, and each amorous spark darts thro' every l...

— Sheridan, Richard Brinsley (1751-1816)

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Date: 1775

The thunder of words may sour the "milk of human kindness" in the breast

— Sheridan, Richard Brinsley (1751-1816)

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Date: 1776-1789

"In the same manner [says Longinus] as some children always remain pigmies, whose infant limbs have been too closely confined; thus our tender minds, fettered by the prejudices and habits of a just servitude, are unable to expand themselves, or to attain that well-proportioned greatness which we ...

— Gibbon, Edward (1737-1794)

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Date: 1776-1789

"The exercises of the body succeeded to those of the mind; and Alexander, who was tall, active, and robust, surpassed most of his equals in the gymnastic arts"

— Gibbon, Edward (1737-1794)

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Date: 1777

"I mention not the graces of her form; yet they are such as would attract the admiration of those, by whom the beauties of her mind might not be understood. In one as well as the other, there is a remarkable conjunction of tenderness with dignity; but her beauty is of that sort, on which we cann...

— Mackenzie, Henry (1745-1831)

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Date: 1777

"The consciousness of what I mean by this letter to reveal, hangs like guilt upon my mind; therefore it is that I have so long delayed writing."

— Mackenzie, Henry (1745-1831)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.