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Date: 1741

"Such practices may happen to discourage and jade the Mind by an Attempt above its Power, it may balk the Understanding, and create an Aversion to future Diligence, and perhaps by Despair may forbid the Pursuit of that subject for ever afterwards; as a Limb over-strained by lifting a Weight above...

— Watts, Isaac (1674-1748)

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Date: 1741

"Yet there should be a Caution given in some Cases: the Memory of a Child or any infirm person should not be over-burdened; for a Limb or a Joint may be overstrained by being too much loaded, and its natural Power never be recovered."

— Watts, Isaac (1674-1748)

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Date: 1741

"'Passion,' continued the doctor, still holding the dish, 'throws the mind into too violent a fermentation; it is a kind of fever of the soul or, as Horace expresses it, a short madness'

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744); Arbuthnot, John (bap. 1677, d. 1735)

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Date: 1741

"Crambe used to value himself upon this system, from whence he said one might see the propriety of the expression, 'such a one has a barren imagination;' and how common it is for such people to adopt conclusions that are not the issue of their premisses."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744); Arbuthnot, John (bap. 1677, d. 1735)

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Date: 1741

"But being weary of all practice on fetid bodies, from a certain niceness of constitution (especially when he attended Dr. Woodward through a twelve-months' course of vomition) he determined to leave it off entirely, and to apply himself only to diseases of the mind."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744); Arbuthnot, John (bap. 1677, d. 1735)

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Date: 1742

A poet may "to the Eye of Judgement ever shine"

— Cooke, Thomas (1703-1756)

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Date: 1742

"The poet says, he makes this courtesan worse than Circe; for she changed the minds and internal disposition of her followers, whereas Circe, as Homer expressly remarks, metamorphosed only their outward form"

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754) and The Reverend William Young (d.1757); Aristophanes (c.448-c.380 B.C.)

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Date: 1742

"The soul affronts itself, when it becomes, as far as it can, an abscess or wen in the universe."

— Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (121-180), Francis Hutcheson (1694-1746), and James Moor (bap. 1712, d. 1779)

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Date: 1742

"He is blind, whose intellectual eye is closed."

— Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (121-180), Francis Hutcheson (1694-1746), and James Moor (bap. 1712, d. 1779)

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Date: 1742

"Imagine their minds naked before you."

— Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (121-180), Francis Hutcheson (1694-1746), and James Moor (bap. 1712, d. 1779)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.