page 26 of 33     per page:
sorted by:

Date: 1739

A mind may be a mind so "famish'd for Drollery, that can taste the silly things this Play is season'd with"

— Baker, Henry (1698-1774); Miller James (1706-1744); Molière (1622-1673)

preview | full record

Date: 1739

"I have had some Scruples, Madam, and opened the Eyes of my Mind upon what I was a doing"

— Baker, Henry (1698-1774); Miller James (1706-1744); Molière (1622-1673)

preview | full record

Date: September 17, 1739

"There are different ways of examining the Mind as well as the Body. One may consider it either as an Anatomist or as a Painter; either to discover its most secret Springs & Principles or to describe the Grace & Beauty of its Actions."

— Hume, David (1711-1776)

preview | full record

Date: January 1739

"Since the imagination, therefore, in running from low to high, finds an opposition in its internal qualities and principles, and since the soul, when elevated with joy and courage, in a manner seeks opposition, and throws itself with alacrity into any scene of thought or action where its courage...

— Hume, David (1711-1776)

preview | full record

Date: 1739

"Thy wounds upon my heart impress, / Nor [a]ught shall the loved stamp efface"

— Wesley, John and Charles

preview | full record

Date: 1739

"Ye Angels speak! / For ye alone are like her; or present / Such Visions pictur'd to the nightly Eye / Of Fancy trans'd in Bliss."

— Brooke, Henry (c. 1703-1783)

preview | full record

Date: 1739

"How poor thy Pow'r, how empty is thy Happiness, / When such a Wretch, as I appear to be, / Can ride thy Temper, harrow up thy Form, / And stretch thy Soul upon the Rack of Passion."

— Brooke, Henry (c. 1703-1783)

preview | full record

Date: 1739

"Where lives the Man whose Reason slumbers not?"

— Brooke, Henry (c. 1703-1783)

preview | full record

Date: January 1739

"The attention is on the stretch; the posture of the mind is uneasy; and the spirits being diverted from their natural course, are not governed in their movements by the same laws, at least not to the same degree, as when they flow in their usual channel."

— Hume, David (1711-1776)

preview | full record

Date: November, 1740

"The anatomist ought never to emulate the painter; nor in his accurate dissections and portraitures of the smaller parts of the human body, pretend to give his figures any graceful and engaging attitude or expression. There is even something hideous, or at least minute, in the views of thing...

— Hume, David (1711-1776)

preview | full record

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.