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Date: 1715-1720

"He sprinkles healing Balmes, to Anguish kind, / And adds Discourse, the Med'cine of the Mind."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: 1715-1720

Aristotle observes, "that when Homer is obliged to describe any thing of itself absurd or too improbable, he constantly contrives to blind and dazle the Judgment of his Readers with some shining Description."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: 1715

"Tho' sure the Loss / Wou'd wound me to the Heart."

— Rowe, Nicholas (1674-1718)

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Date: 1715

"Read there the fatal Purpose of thy Foe, / A Thought which Wounds my Soul with Shame and Horror."

— Rowe, Nicholas (1674-1718)

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Date: 1715

"'Twas Zeno's Advice to Dip the Tongue in the Mind before one should Speak."

— Bulstrode, Richard, Sir (1610-1711)

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Date: 1715

"But Malvezzi tell us, it is, for that Nature in Providence drives away the Evil from it self, and thriftily reserves that which is Good; and for this Reason it is, says he, that those who have the Plague are desirous to come into Company, that they may give it to others; and by the same Reason, ...

— Bulstrode, Richard, Sir (1610-1711)

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Date: 1715

"The Temper of a Child misled by Vice or Mistake, like a dislocated Bone, is easie to be reduc'd into its Place, if taken in time; but if suffer'd to remain in its dislocated Position, a callous Substance fills up the empty Space, and by neglect grows equally hard with the Bone, and resisting the...

— Defoe, Daniel (1660?-1731)

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Date: 1715-1720

"And yet no dire Presage so wounds my Mind, / My Mother's Death, the Ruin of my Kind, / Not Priam 's hoary Hairs defil'd with Gore, / Not all my Brothers gasping on the Shore; / As thine, Andromache!"

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: 1716

"But the greatest imperfection is in our inward sight, that is, to be Ghosts unto our own Eyes, and while we are so sharpsighted as to look thorough others, to be invisible to our selves; for the inward Eyes are more fallacious than the outward."

— Browne, Sir Thomas (1605-1682)

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Date: 1718

Were it not for the Optic Nerves, the eyes might conspire the ruin of the mind: "That They shou'd see and She be blind."

— Prior, Matthew (1664-1721)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.