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Date: 1727

"It is without Doubt, that Fancy and Imagination form a world of Apparitions in the Minds of Men and Women; (for we must not exclude the Ladies in this Part, whatever we do) and People go away as thoroughly possess'd with the Reality of having seen the Devil, as if they convers'd Face to Face wit...

— Defoe, Daniel (1660?-1731)

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Date: Friday, April 21, 1727

"For though it is generally believed that few Statesmen are much afflicted with this terrible Inmate; yet, upon a careful Inspection of human Nature, I find it to be a vulgar Error; and am fully satisfied that, notwithstanding the outward placid Behaviour and smiling Aspect of t...

— Caleb d'Anvers [pseud. for Nicholas Amhurst, Henry, Viscount Bolingbroke, and William Pulteney, Earl of Bath]

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Date: 1728

A peevish, pettish temper "disarms the Heart of its natural Integrity; it induces us to throw away our true Armour, our natural Courage, and cowardly to commit our selves to the vain Protection of others, while we neglect our own Defence"

— Hutcheson, Francis (1694-1746)

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Date: 1728 (1733)

"Now,'tis this Dependence, which the Mind Is always conscious she has upon the Body, that engageth her in so very deep a Concern for it. For if the Mind suffer'd no Alteration in her State, from whatever Impressions might be made on it by external Objects, we have no Reason to believe, but that s...

— Campbell, Archibald (1691-1756)

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Date: 1729

"Among the helluones librorum, the Cormorants of Books, there are wretched Reasoners, that have canine Appetites, and no Digestion."

— Mandeville, Bernard (bap. 1670, d. 1733)

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Date: 1731

"Whereas Sense it self is but the Passive Perception of some Individual Material Forms, but to Know or Understand is Actively to Comprehend a thing by some Abstract, Free and Universal Reasonings, from whence the Mind as it were looking down (as Boetius expresseth it) upon the Individuals below i...

— Cudworth, Ralph (1617-1688)

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Date: 1731

"The Eye which is placed in a Level with the Sea, and touches the Surface of it, cannot take any large Prospect upon the Sea, much less see the whole Amplitude of it. But an Eye Elevated to a higher Station, and from thence looking down, may comprehensively view the whole Sea at once, or at least...

— Cudworth, Ralph (1617-1688)

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Date: 1731

"Lastly, from hence is that strange Parturiency that is often observed in the Mind, when it is sollicitously set upon the Investigation of some Truth, whereby it doth endeavour, by ruminating and revolving within it self as it were to conceive it within itself, to bring it forth out of its own Wo...

— Cudworth, Ralph (1617-1688)

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Date: 1731

"Wherefore that we may the better understand how far the Passion of Sense reaches, and where the Activity of the Mind begins, we will compare these three Things together: First, a Mirror, Looking-glass or Crystal Globe; Secondly, a Living Eye, that is, a Seeing or Perceptive Mirror or Looking-gla...

— Cudworth, Ralph (1617-1688)

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Date: 1731

"For what is Pulchritude in Visible Objects, or Harmony in Sounds, but the Proportion, Symmetry and Commensuration of Figures, and Sounds to one another, whereby Infinity is Measured and Determined, and Multiplicity and Variety vanquished and triumphed over by Unity, and by that means they become...

— Cudworth, Ralph (1617-1688)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.