page 56 of 66     per page:
sorted by:

Date: 1820

"And we breathe, and sicken not, / The atmosphere of human thought: / Be it dim, and dank, and gray, / Like a storm-extinguished day, / Travelled o'er by dying gleams; / Be it bright as all between / Cloudless skies and windless streams, / Silent, liquid, and serene; / As the birds within the win...

— Shelley, Percy Bysshe (1792-1822)

preview | full record

Date: 1821

"Swift as a Thought by the snake Memory stung, / From her ambrosial rest the fading Splendour sprung."

— Shelley, Percy Bysshe (1792-1822)

preview | full record

Date: 1821

"And his own thoughts, along that rugged way, / Pursued, like raging hounds, their father and their prey"

— Shelley, Percy Bysshe (1792-1822)

preview | full record

Date: 1821

One may have "A pardlike Spirit beautiful and swift."

— Shelley, Percy Bysshe (1792-1822)

preview | full record

Date: 1821

"Like corpses in a charnel; fear and grief / Convulse us and consume us day by day, / And cold hopes swarm like worms within our living clay."

— Shelley, Percy Bysshe (1792-1822)

preview | full record

Date: 1824

"'I rose; and, bending at her sweet command, / Touched with faint lips the cup she raised, / And suddenly my brain became as sand / 'Where the first wave had more than half erased / The track of deer on desert Labrador; / Whilst the wolf, from which they fled amazed, / 'Leaves his stamp visibly u...

— Shelley, Percy Bysshe (1792-1822)

preview | full record

Date: 1831

"We spurn at the bounds of time and space; nor would the thought be less futile that imagines to imprison the mind within the limits of the body, than the attempt of the booby clown who is said within a thick hedge to have plotted to shut in the flight of an eagle"

— Godwin, William (1756-1836)

preview | full record

Date: 1831

"In this sense a numerous school is, to a degree that can scarcely be adequately described, the slaughter-house of mind."

— Godwin, William (1756-1836)

preview | full record

Date: 1805-6, published 1833-6

"Spirit often seems to have forgotten and lost itself, but inwardly opposed to itself, it is inwardly working ever forward (as when Hamlet says of the ghost of his father, 'Well said, old mole! canst work i' the ground so fast?') until grown strong in itself it bursts asunder the crust of earth w...

— Hegel, G. W. F. (1770-1831)

preview | full record

Date: August 31, 1837

"But for the evidence thence afforded to the philosophical doctrine of the identity of all minds, we should suppose some preestablished harmony, some foresight of souls that were to be, and some preparation of stores for their future wants, like the fact observed in insects, who lay up food befor...

— Emerson, Ralph Waldo (1803-1882)

preview | full record

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.