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Date: 1670, rev. 1678

"To chew the cud upon a thing ... To consider of a thing, to revolve it in one's mind: to ruminate, which is the name of this action, is used in the same sense both in Latin and English."

— Ray [formerly Wray], John (1627-1705)

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Date: 1678

"I left off to watch, and be sober; I laid the reins upon the neck of my lusts; I sinned against the light of the Word, and the goodness of God."

— Bunyan, John (bap. 1628, d. 1688)

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Date: 1678

"This conceit would loosen the reines of our lust, and tollerate us to live as we list."

— Bunyan, John (bap. 1628, d. 1688)

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Date: 1678

"But, like a mole in earth, busy and blind, / [the soul] Works all her folly up, and casts it outward / To the world's open view"

— Dryden, John (1631-1700)

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Date: 1681

"Here at the fountain's sliding foot, / Or at some fruit tree's mossy root, / Casting the body's vest aside, / My soul into the boughs does glide; / There like a bird it sits and sings, / Then whets, and combs its silver wings; / And, till prepar'd for longer flight, / Waves in its plumes the var...

— Marvell, Andrew (1621-1678)

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Date: 1682

"O play not with my Heart, as Children do / With some poor Bird, which while they love, they shew. / One over-weening grasp of life bereaves, / And in a moment all the joy deceives."

— Coppinger, Matthew (fl. 1682)

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Date: 1683

"To Reason's yoke she quickly will incline, / Which, far from hurting, renders her divine; / But if neglected, will as easily stray, / And master Reason, which she should obey."

— Dryden, John (1631-1700) [Poem ascribed to]

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Date: 1683

Reason may (not) "rule the Rost"

— Dixon, Robert (1614/15-1688).

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Date: 1683

" How does Reason rule the Rost. / When Lasciviousness rides Post?"

— Dixon, Robert (1614/15-1688).

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Date: 1684

"Much like th' ore-fond, tormented Lover, / Whose Travels Scorns alone discover / To th' chased Stag? Their Dwellings bear / Same form, sad-fortun'd Both appear, / Wilderness round his Fancy shows, / Which wild, disorder'd Thoughts compose; / Hunted by Dogs each strong for Scent / (Grief, Rage, D...

— Harington, John (1627-1700)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.