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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Whenever the memory brings any idea into actual view, it is with a consciousness, that it had been there before, and was not wholly a stranger to the mind"

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"I pretend not to teach, but to enquire, and therefore cannot but confess here again, that external and internal sensation are the only passages I can find of knowledge to the understanding"

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Secondly, because sometimes I find, that I cannot avoid the having those ideas produced in my mind. For though when my eyes are shut, or windows fast, I can at pleasure recal to my mind the ideas of light, or the sun, which former sensations had lodged in my memory"

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"The ignorance and darkness that is in us, no more hinders nor confines the knowledge that is in others, than the blindness of a mole is an argument against the quicksightedness of an eagle"

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"As it is in the motions of the body, so it is in the thoughts of our minds: Where any one is such, that we have power to take it up, or lay it by, according to the preference of the mind, there we are at liberty"

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"A Man on the Rack, is not at liberty to lay by the Idea of pain, and divert himself with other Contemplations: And sometimes a boisterous Passion hurries our Thoughts, as a Hurricane does our Bodies, without leaving us the liberty of thinking on other things, which we would rather chuse."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"He that has his chains knocked off, and the prison doors set open to him, is perfectly at liberty, because he may either go or stay, as he best likes; though his preference be determined to stay, by the darkness of the night, or illness of the weather, or want of other lodging."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"The mind has a different relish, as well as the palate; and you will as fruitlessly endeavour to delight all men with riches or glory (which yet some men place their happiness in) as you would to satisfy all men's hunger with cheese or lobsters; which, though very agreeable and delicious fare to...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"[W]hereas those innate principles are supposed to be quite of another nature; not coming into the mind by any accidental alterations in, or operations on the body; but, as it were, original characters impressed upon it, in the very first moment of its being and constitution."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Just thus it is with our ideas, which are as it were the pictures of things."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.