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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Though God has given us no innate Ideas of himself; though he has stamped no original Characters in our Minds, wherein we may read his Being: yet having furnished us with those Faculties, our Minds are endowed with, he hath not left himself without witness: since we have Sense, Percepti...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"In the former case, our Knowledge is the consequence of the Existence of Things producing Ideas in our Minds by our Senses: in the latter, Knowledge is the consequence of the Ideas that are in our Minds whatsoever they are, and produce general certain Propositions, many whereof...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Not that I want a due respect to other Mens Opinions; but after all, the greatest reverence is due to Truth; and, I hope, it will not be thought arrogance, to say, That, perhaps, we should make greater progress in the discovery of rational and contemplative Knowledge, if we sought it in the Foun...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Such borrowed Wealth, like Fairy-money, though it were Gold in the hand from which he received it, will be but Leaves and Dust when it comes to use."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"The Understanding seems to me, not to have the least glimmering of any Ideas, which it doth not receive from one of these two: Eternal Objects furnish the Mind with the Ideas of sensible qualities, which are all those different perceptions they produced in us: And the Mind furnishes the Understa...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"These, when we have taken a full survey of them, and their several modes, and the Compositions made out of them, we shall find to contain all our whole stock of Ideas; and that we have nothing in our Minds, which did not come in, one of these two ways."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Let any one examine his own Thoughts, and throughly search into his Understanding, and then let him tell me, Whether all the original Ideas he has there, are any other than of the Objects of his Senses, or of the Operations of his Mind, considered as Objects of his Reflection: and how great a ma...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"I see no Reason therefore to believe, that the Soul thinks before the Senses have furnished it with Ideas to think on; and as those are increased, and retained; so it comes, by Exercise, to improve its Faculty of thinking in the several parts of it, as well as afterwards, by compounding those Id...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Nor let any one think these too narrow bounds for the capacious Mind of Man to expatiate in, which takes its flight farther than the Stars, and cannot be confined by the limits of the World; that extends its thoughts often even beyond the utmost expansion of Matter, and makes excursions into tha...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Nor will it be so strange, to think these few simple Ideas sufficient to employ the quickest Thought, or largest Capacity; and to furnish the Materials of all that various Knowledge, and more various Phansies and Opinions of all Mankind, if we consider how many Words may be made out of the vario...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.