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Date: Monday, April 28, 1712

"This must certainly be a most charming Exercise to the Mind that is rightly turned for it."

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: 1713, 1734

"We are chained to a body, that is to say, our perceptions are connected with corporeal motions."

— Berkeley, George (1685-1753)

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Date: w. 1702-1713, 1989

"By turns a thousand inclinations rise / & each by turns as impotently dies."

— Parnell, Thomas (1679-1718)

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Date: 1720

"Severity makes more Hypocrites than any Sort of Discipline; streight lacing the Body may make us good Shapes, but there's no streight lacing our Minds."

— Shadwell, Charles (fl. 1692-1720)

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Date: 1722

One's head and heart may be "on the rack" about something worrisome

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: 1725

"No, said Octavio, if thou art Clara, thou art still the only Creature upon Earth that can give relief to my distracted Mind and wounded Heart; thy Wrongs have cost me too many Months repose, and I have given up my self too much to the thoughts of thee, to slight or despise thee now I have found ...

— Davys, Mary (1674-1732)

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Date: 1726

One may be galled "with Reproaches and Contempt, more heavy, and corroding into my Soul, than the Load and Rust of my Irons eating into my Flesh? "

— Southerne, Thomas (1659-1746)

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Date: March 13, 1727

"And is not virtue in mankind / The nutriment that feeds the mind; / Upheld by each good action past, / And still continued by the last?"

— Swift, Jonathan (1667-1745)

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Date: 1727

Men's Reason "tyes them down to Rules," while women, "like Sampson break the trifling Twine and laugh at every Obstacle that would oppose [their] pleasure"

— Davys, Mary (1674-1732)

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Date: 1728

A peevish, pettish temper "disarms the Heart of its natural Integrity; it induces us to throw away our true Armour, our natural Courage, and cowardly to commit our selves to the vain Protection of others, while we neglect our own Defence"

— Hutcheson, Francis (1694-1746)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.