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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"He that has his chains knocked off, and the prison doors set open to him, is perfectly at liberty, because he may either go or stay, as he best likes; though his preference be determined to stay, by the darkness of the night, or illness of the weather, or want of other lodging."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"[N]othing is so unfit to assist the mind in that, as syllogism; which running away with one assumed probability, or one topical argument, pursues that till it has led the mind quite out of sight of the thing under consideration; and forcing it upon some remote difficulty, holds it fast there, in...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Tell a country gentlewoman that the wind is south-west, and the weather lowering, and like to rain, and she will easily understand it is not safe for her to go abroad thin clad, in such a day, after a fever: She clearly sees the probable connexion of all these, viz. south-west wind, and clouds, ...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1691

"Grace doth our Souls to God unite, / Like glorious Golden Chains."

— Keach, Benjamin (1640-1704)

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Date: 1691

"By Law and Inclination doubly joyn'd, / Both acted by one Sympathetick Mind. / Whom Wedlock's Silken Chains as softly tye, / As that which when asunder snapt, we dye, / Which makes the Soul and Body's wondrous harmony."

— Ames, Richard (bap. 1664?, d. 1692)

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Date: 1691

"Here wisely-flowing Eloquence disdains / To be confin'd, but in Poetick Chains: / Sweet are the Bonds, that tye the Soul to Sense / And scope allow for All things, but Offence!"

— Heyrick, Thomas (bap. 1649. d. 1694)

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Date: 1691

"Why then shou'd I not pull up the stake, or get my Lock and Chain off, and scamper away in the interminable Fields of the invisible World."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"Towards the end of which Chapter Evander confesses his Wit has a little run away with him; so ungovernable a thing is towring Fancy, when not hand-cufft by powerful Reason, flying out against Learning, beloved Learning, at so Satyrical a rate as almost makes his heart bleed to read it, when he t...

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1692

"There is no other dealing with you but violence, you use my heart worse than a Pirate would an utter Enemy, and put more chains than a Christian Slave has in the Turkish Bilboes--what did you mean by this Letter? why d'ye use me thus barbarously?"

— D'Urfey, Thomas (1653?-1723)

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Date: Licens'd Decemb. 22. 1691

"Madam, it is no small demonstration of the entire Resignation which I have made of my Heart to your Chains, since the secrets of it are no longer in my power."

— Congreve, William (1670-1729)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.