page 5 of 11     per page:
sorted by:

Date: Monday, June 23, 1712

"Every thing that is new or uncommon raises a Pleasure in the Imagination, because it fills the Soul with an agreeable Surprize, gratifies its Curiosity, and gives it an Idea of which it was not before possest."

— Addison, Joseph (1672-1719)

preview | full record

Date: Tuesday, June 24, 1712

"Our Admiration, which is a very pleasing Motion of the Mind, immediately rises at the Consideration of any Object that takes up a great deal of Room in the Fancy, and by Consequence, will improve into the highest Pitch of Astonishment and Devotion when we contemplate his Nature, that is neither ...

— Addison, Joseph (1672-1719)

preview | full record

Date: Friday, June 27, 1712

"Since it is in the Power of the Imagination, when it is once Stocked with particular Ideas, to enlarge, compound, and vary them at her own Pleasure."

— Addison, Joseph (1672-1719)

preview | full record

Date: Wednesday, July 2, 1712

"Our Reason can pursue a Particle of Matter through an infinite Variety of Divisions, but the Fancy soon loses sight of it, and feels in it self a kind of Chasm, that wants to be filled with Matter of a more sensible Bulk."

— Addison, Joseph (1672-1719)

preview | full record

Date: Wednesday, July 2, 1712

"Perhaps there may not be room in the Brain for such a variety of Impressions, or the Animal Spirits may be incapable of figuring them in such a manner, as is necessary to excite so very large or very minute Ideas."

— Addison, Joseph (1672-1719)

preview | full record

Date: Saturday, June 21, 1712

"[Sight] fills the Mind with the largest Variety of Ideas, converses with its Objects at the greatest Distance, and continues the longest in Action without being tired or satiated with its proper Enjoyments."

— Addison, Joseph (1672-1719)

preview | full record

Date: Saturday, June 21, 1712

"For this Reason Sir Francis Bacon, in his Essay upon Health, has not thought it improper to prescribe to his Reader a Poem or a Prospect, where he particularly dissuades him from knotty and subtile Disquisitions, and advises him to pursue Studies that fill the Mind with splendid and illustrious ...

— Addison, Joseph (1672-1719)

preview | full record

Date: July 23, 1703; 1714

"Time, I daily find, blots out apace the little Stock of my Mind, and has disabled me from furnishing all that I would willingly contribute to the Memory of that Learned Man.."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1715

"And therefore the Philosopher said well to the Child, 'Loquere ut te videam', Speak that I may see thee, that is the Inside of thee; for as Vessels are known whether they be broken or whole by their inward Sound; so is Man from his Speech, which carries with it not only a great Influence, but a ...

— Bulstrode, Richard, Sir (1610-1711)

preview | full record

Date: 1722

"For before the Vessel be seasoned with one kind of Liquor, it is equally capable of all, and so the Wax is indifferent to any Impression, before it is moulded and determined by a particular Seal: If the Mind be a rasa Tabula, as Aristotle would have it, then this White Paper may best be i...

— Hartcliffe, John (1651/2-1712)

preview | full record

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.