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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Just thus it is with our ideas, which are as it were the pictures of things."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"[N]othing is so unfit to assist the mind in that, as syllogism; which running away with one assumed probability, or one topical argument, pursues that till it has led the mind quite out of sight of the thing under consideration; and forcing it upon some remote difficulty, holds it fast there, in...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"For to apply this Answer with any tolerable Sence to our present Purpose, it must signify one of these two things; either, That as soon as Men come to the use of Reason, these supposed native Inscriptions come to be known, and observed by them; Or else, that the Use and Exercise of Men's Reason,...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"A Man receives a sensible Injury from another, thinks on the Man and that Action over and over; and by ruminating on them strongly, or much in his mind, so cements those two Ideas together, that he makes them almost one."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"A pestle and mortar will as soon bring any particle of matter to indivisibility, as the acutest thought of a mathematician; and a surveyor may as soon with his chain measure out infinite space, as a philosopher by the quickest flight of mind reach it, or by thinking comprehend it; which is to ha...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"This, as has been already observed, is seen only by the eye, or the perceptive faculty of the mind, taking a view of them laid together, in a juxta-position; which view of any two it has equally, whenever they are laid together in any proposition, whether that proposition be placed as a major or...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Tell a country gentlewoman that the wind is south-west, and the weather lowering, and like to rain, and she will easily understand it is not safe for her to go abroad thin clad, in such a day, after a fever: She clearly sees the probable connexion of all these, viz. south-west wind, and clouds, ...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Yet I suspect, I say, that this way of speaking of Faculties has misled many into a confused Notion of so many distinct Agents in us, which had their several Provinces and Authorities, and did command, obey, and perform several Actions, as so many distinct Beings; which has been no small occasio...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Whatever then we talk of innate, either speculative or practical Principles, it may, with as much probability, be said, That a Man hath 100 l. sterling in his Pocket, and yet denied, that he hath there either Penny, Shilling, Crown, or other Coin, out of which the Sum ...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Earthly minds, like mud-walls, resist the strongest batteries: And though perhaps sometimes the force of a clear argument may make some impression, yet they nevertheless stand firm, and keep out the enemy truth, that would captivate or disturb them."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.