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Date: 1801

"Stampt on my soul, and with my life combin'd, / Is the remembrance of my much-lov'd King"

— Burges, Sir James Bland (1752-1824)

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Date: 1801

"Heaven stamped that energy in your heart, which raised your avenging arm"

— Cobb, James (1756-1818)

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Date: 1802

"Is prouder yet in sterling worth to shine, / Stamp'd by the friendship of a mind like thine"

— Pye, Henry James (1745-1813)

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Date: 1802

One may be persuaded "to drink / That charmed cup, which Reason's mintage fair / Unmoulds, and stamps the monster on the man"

— Warton, Thomas, the younger (1728-1790)

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Date: 1802

"Blest mirror! which can thus, with magic pow'r, / Give the rank weed the fragrance of the flow'r; / And from deformities,--without, within, / Spots in the mind, or specks upon the skin-- / Can all that's good, and all that's fair reflect, / And change to beauty, every dark defect."

— Pratt, Samuel Jackson [pseud. Courtney Melmoth] (1749-1814)

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Date: September 10, 1802

"A Poet's Heart & Intellect should be combined, intimately combined & unified, with the great appearances in Nature -- & not merely held in solution & loose mixture with them, in the shape of formal Similies."

— Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1772-1834)

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Date: 1803

"Why, curst remembrance, wilt thou haunt my mind?"

— Chatterton, Thomas (1752-1770)

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Date: 1803

A partner of one's "future state" should not have "strong vice" "stamped upon her mind"

— Chatterton, Thomas (1752-1770)

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Date: 1803

"He stammers,--instantaneously is drawn / A bordered piece of inspiration-lawn, / Which being thrice unto his nose applied, / Into his pineal gland the vapours glide; / And now again we hear the doctor roar / On subjects he dissected thrice before."

— Chatterton, Thomas (1752-1770)

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Date: 1803

"Though, when black melancholy damps my joys, / I call them nature's trifles, airy toys; / Yet when the goddess Reason guides the strain, / I think them, what they are, a heavenly train."

— Chatterton, Thomas (1752-1770)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.