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Date: 1734

"We see and feel these limbs, and this flesh of ours; we are acquainted at least with the outside of this animal machine, and sometimes call it ourselves, though philosophy and reason would rather say, it is our house or tabernacle, because we possess it, or dwell in it: it is our en...

— Watts, Isaac (1674-1748)

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Date: 1734

"A surprising Ph├Žnomenon of nature is this, that the soul of man, which ranges abroad though the heavens, and the earth, and the deep waters, and unfolds a thousand mysteries of nature, which penetrates the systems of stars and suns, worlds upon worlds, should be so unhappy a stranger at home, an...

— Watts, Isaac (1674-1748)

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Date: 1741

"Without Memory the Soul of Man would be but a poor destitute naked Being, with an everlasting Blank spread over it, except the fleeting ideas of the present Moment."

— Watts, Isaac (1674-1748)

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Date: 1741

"In this, therefore, I am forced to differ from that great Philosopher and Master of Reason, Mr. Locke, who denies and argues against all innate Ideas in general, and of every Kind: He supposes the Soul originally to be as a rasa Tabula, or Blank without any Impression, or distingui...

— Morgan, Thomas (d. 1743)

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Date: 1741

"The same Apology of the Length of Years in composing this Book may serve also to excuse a Repetition of the same Sentiments which may happen to be found in different Places without the Author's Design; but in other Pages it was intended, so that those Rules for the Conduct of the Understanding w...

— Watts, Isaac (1674-1748)

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Date: 1741

"Yet all Persons are under some Obligation to improve their own Understanding, otherwise it will be a barren Desart, or a Forest overgrown grown with Weeds and Brambles."

— Watts, Isaac (1674-1748)

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Date: 1741

"You should therefore contrive and practice some proper Methods to acquaint yourself with your own Ignorance, and to impress your Mind with a deep and painful sense of the low and imperfect Degrees of your present Knowledge, that you may be incited with Labour and Activity to pursue after greater...

— Watts, Isaac (1674-1748)

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Date: 1741

"The very Greek Heathens by the Light of Reason were taught to say, [GREEK CHARACTERS], and the Latins, A Jove principium, Musae."

— Watts, Isaac (1674-1748)

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Date: 1741

"But when Studentio had once persuaded his Mind to tie itself down to this Method which I have prescribed, he sensibly gain'd an admirable Facility to read, and judge of what he read, by his daily Practice of it, and the Man made large Advances in the Pursuit of Truth; while Plumbinus and Plumeo ...

— Watts, Isaac (1674-1748)

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Date: 1741

"The Man of much Reading and a large retentive Memory, but without Meditation, may become in the Sense of the World a knowing Man; and if he converses much with the Ancients, he may attain the Fame of Learning too: but he spends his Days afar off from Wisdom an...

— Watts, Isaac (1674-1748)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.