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Date: 1782

"The consternation of doubt and astonishment which had seized every faculty of Cecilia, now changed into certainty that Delvile indeed was present, all her recollection returned as she listened to this question, and the wild rambling of fancy with which she had incautiously indulged her sorrow, r...

— Burney [married name D'Arblay], Frances (1752-1840)

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Date: 1782

"This question, which so often and so angrily she had revolved in her own mind, again silenced her; and Delvile, with the eagerness of approaching success, redoubled his solicitations."

— Burney [married name D'Arblay], Frances (1752-1840)

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Date: 1782

"She determined, as much as was in her power, in quitting her desultory dwellings, to empty her mind of the transactions which had passed in them, and upon entering a house where she was permanently to reside, to make the expulsion of her past sorrows, the basis upon which to establish her future...

— Burney [married name D'Arblay], Frances (1752-1840)

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Date: 1782

"She told her not what had passed; that, she knew, would be fruitless affiction to her: but she was soothed by her gentleness, and her conversation was some security from the dangerous rambling of her ideas."

— Burney [married name D'Arblay], Frances (1752-1840)

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Date: 1782

"These thoughts, which confusedly, yet forcibly, rushed upon her mind, brought with them at once an excuse for his conduct, and an alarm for his danger."

— Burney [married name D'Arblay], Frances (1752-1840)

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Date: 1782

"Again her fancy roved, and Mr. Monckton took sole possession of it."

— Burney [married name D'Arblay], Frances (1752-1840)

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Date: 1786

"Perhaps of my policy to, in confessing at once, what my wandering ideas, and disjointed style would soon have discover'd."

— Lee, Harriet (1757/8-1851)

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Date: 1788

"These various movements of her mind were not commented on, nor were the luxuriant shoots restrained by culture."

— Wollstonecraft, Mary (1759-1797)

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Date: 1788

"Thro' the mind of Delamere, a thousand confused ideas rapidly passed."

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1788

"The idea which seemed to press most painfully on her mind, was the blemish which the purity of her character must sustain by her being so long absent with Delamere--a blemish which she knew could hardly ever be removed but by her returning as his wife."

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.