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Date: 1790

"The high importance of the moment, the solemnity of the ceremony, the sacred glooms which surrounded me, and the chilling silence that prevailed when I uttered the irrevocable vow--all conspired to impress my imagination, and to raise my views to heaven."

— Radcliffe [née Ward], Ann (1764-1823)

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Date: 1790

"I had but one crime to deplore, and that was the too tender remembrance of him for whom I mourned, and whose idea impressed upon my heart, made it a blemished offering to God."

— Radcliffe [née Ward], Ann (1764-1823)

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Date: 1790

"He was undeceived too late. The world will blame his imprudence, and think he deserved to suffer from it: but, while foresight and policy are so common, let us forgive those few minds of trusting simplicity, who are taught in vain the lesson of suspicion, on whom impressions are easily made, and...

— Williams, Helen Maria (1759-1827)

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Date: 1790

"Her mind resembled an empty mirror, which has no character, no images of its own, borrows every impression from some passing object, and, if left to itself, would for ever remain vacant."

— Williams, Helen Maria (1759-1827)

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Date: 1790

"Julia was now called away, but Mrs. Evans's narrative had made a deep impression on her mind."

— Williams, Helen Maria (1759-1827)

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Date: 1794

"He and Emily continued sunk in musing silence for some leagues, from which melancholy reverie Emily first awoke, and her young fancy, struck with the grandeur of the objects around, gradually yielded to delightful impressions."

— Radcliffe [née Ward], Ann (1764-1823)

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Date: 1794

"They travelled on, sunk in that thoughtful melancholy, with which twilight and solitude impress the mind."

— Radcliffe [née Ward], Ann (1764-1823)

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Date: 1794

"St. Aubert concealed his face with his handkerchief, and was unable to speak; but Emily continued to urge to her father the truths, which himself had impressed upon her mind."

— Radcliffe [née Ward], Ann (1764-1823)

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Date: 1794

"'Can this be my father's sister!' said she to herself; and then the conviction that she was so, warming her heart with something like kindness towards her, she felt anxious to soften the harsh impression her mind had received of her aunt's character, and to shew a willingness to oblige her."

— Radcliffe [née Ward], Ann (1764-1823)

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Date: 1794

"Her thoughts, however, did not dwell long on the subject; nearer interests pressed upon them; Valancourt, rejected of her aunt, and Valancourt dancing with a gay and beautiful partner, alternately tormented her mind."

— Radcliffe [née Ward], Ann (1764-1823)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.