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Date: 1700

"For (says he) Man can no more be a Light to his Mind than he is to his Body: And thence infers, that as the Eye has no Light in it self, so neither the Understanding."

— Leslie, Charles (1650-1722)

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Date: 1700

" I will not take advantage of the Philosophy of this; for, I suppose his meaning to be, that it is Natural to the Understanding to Receive a Light that is infused into it, as for the Eye to see by an Extraneous light; that is, it is an Organ fitted to Receive Light, tho' it has none in it self; ...

— Leslie, Charles (1650-1722)

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Date: 1704

"A master workman shall blow his nose so powerfully as to pierce the hearts of his people, who were disposed to receive the excrements of his brain with the same reverence as the issue of it."

— Swift, Jonathan (1667-1745)

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Date: 1704

"For he tells us in the beginning of the Treatise that the Sublime does not so properly persuade us, as it Ravishes and Transports us, and produces in us a certain Admiration mingled with astonishment and with surprise, which is quite another thing than the barely Pleasing or the barely perswadin...

— Dennis, John (1658-1734)

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Date: Read 1680-1681, published 1705

"But of this, and the manner of contracting of the Pupil, more, when I come to explain that part of the Eye; that which intention it for at present is, only to explain how the Eye becomes as it were a Hand, by which the Brain feels, and touches (the Objects, by creating a Motion in the Retina, th...

— Hooke, Robert (1635-1703)

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Date: 1706 [first published 1658]

"Appetite, the Affection of the Mind, by which we are stirr'd up to any thing, inordinate Desire, Lust: Also the desire of Nourishment, or a Stomach to one's Victuals."

— Phillips, Edward (1630-1696)

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Date: 1706 [first published 1658]

"Conception, the Product of the Mind, as a Thought, Notion, or Principle; the Simple Ideas or apprehension that a Man has of any Thing, without proceeding to affirm or deny and Point relating thereto; also a Conceiving with Child, or breeding."

— Phillips, Edward (1630-1696)

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Date: 1707

The mind may be "soak'd in the bottom of the Belly" of one's Ignorance so that he needs the syrup of understanding and knowledge "to liquify the Matter" of his thoughts.

— Anonymous

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Date: 1708, 1714

"They are certainly as ill Physicians in the Body-Politick, who wou'd needs be tampering with these mental Eruptions; and under the specious pretence of healing this Itch of Superstition, and saving Souls from the Contagion of Enthusiasm, shou'd set all Nature in an uproar, and turn a few innocen...

— Cooper, Anthony Ashley, third earl of Shaftesbury (1671-1713)

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Date: September 20, 1692; 1708

"There are Beauties of the Mind, as well as of the Body, that take and prevail at first sight: And where-ever I have met with this, I have readily surrendered my self, and have never yet been deceiv'd in my Expectation."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.