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Date: 1900

"Who stamped us with the minting die / Of this unconquerable need / To know the unknown Deity / And name the nameless in a creed?"

— Money-Coutts, Francis Burdett Thomas, 5th Lord Latimer (1852-1923)

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Date: 1900, 1901

"Between nature and ourselves, nay, between ourselves and our own consciousness a veil is interposed: a veil that is dense and opaque for the common herd,--thin, almost transparent, for the artist and the poet. What fairy wove that veil?"

— Bergson, Henri-Louis (1859-1941)

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Date: 1900, 1901

"We move amidst generalities and symbols, as within a tilt-yard in which our force is effectively pitted against other forces; and fascinated by action, tempted by it, for our own good, on to the field it has selected, we live in a zone midway between things and ourselves, externally to things, e...

— Bergson, Henri-Louis (1859-1941)

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Date: 1901

"The double aspect theory ... professes to overcome the onesidedness of these two theories [materialism and idealism] by regarding both series as only different aspects of the same reality, like the convex and the concave views of a curve (G.H. Lewes); or, according to another favourite metaphor,...

— Baldwin, James Mark (1861-1934)

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Date: 1901

"Repeating Locke's metaphor, Kant blames Hume for declaring certain questions to lie beyond the 'horizon' of human knowledge, without determining where that horizon falls."

— Baldwin, James Mark (1861-1934)

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Date: 1901-2, 1902

"It is to be hoped that we all have some friend, perhaps more often feminine than masculine, and young than old, whose soul is of this sky-blue tint, whose affinities are rather with flowers and birds and all enchanting innocencies than with dark human passions, who can think no ill of man or God...

— James, William (1842-1910)

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Date: 1901-2, 1902

"Such fleeting aspirations are mere 'velleitates,' whimsies. They exist on the remoter outskirts of the mind and the real self of the man, the centre of his energies, is occupied with an entirely different system."

— James, William (1842-1910)

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Date: 1901-2, 1902

"In the end we fall back on the hackneyed symbolism of a mechanical equilibrium. A mind is a system of ideas, each with the excitement it arouses, and with tendencies impulsive and inhibitive, which mutually check or reinforce one another."

— James, William (1842-1910)

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Date: 1902

"Suddenly, in the midst of some train of thought, rises the sought-for line, like a ghost out of a gulf."

— Spiller, Gustav (1864-1940)

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Date: 1902

"If it were otherwise, no one could even set down on paper a closely reasoned argument, for the attention would be skipping like a stone hurrying down a sharp incline, or it would be moving hither and thither like a helpless shuttlecock at the mercy of eager players."

— Spiller, Gustav (1864-1940)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.