"Haste, haste thee quickly to my aid, / And tune my jarring soul to love."

— Bickerstaff, Isaac (b. 1733, d. after 1808)


Place of Publication
London
Publisher
Printed for R. and J. Dodsley
Date
1756
Metaphor
"Haste, haste thee quickly to my aid, / And tune my jarring soul to love."
Metaphor in Context
PHOEBUS.
Be wise in time, and stop your tongue,
Another word's destruction sure as hell.
Now hearken, and take care t'observe me well.
By that irrevocable oath I swear,
Which even gods themselves with trembling take,
By the eternal, gloomy Flood, if e'er
You breathe again what you've presum'd to speak
This instant, life shall expiate the offence.
Reply not; make no answer: get you hence.
Oh where, too charming, cruel maid,
Unmindful dost thou rove?
Why is my bliss thus long delay'd?
Haste, haste thee quickly to my aid,
And tune my jarring soul to love.

(I.iii, pp. 15-16)
Categories
Provenance
ECCO-TCP
Citation
Never acted. Only 1 entry in ESTC (1756).

Leuc├Âthoe. A Dramatic Poem (London: Printed for R. and J. Dodsley, 1756). <Link to ECCO-TCP>
Date of Entry
08/26/2013

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.