"By stronger contagion, the popular affections were communicated from breast to breast, in this place of general rendezvous and society."

— Hume, David (1711-1776)


Place of Publication
Edinburgh
Publisher
Printed by Hamilton, Balfour, and Neill
Date
1754, 1762
Metaphor
"By stronger contagion, the popular affections were communicated from breast to breast, in this place of general rendezvous and society."
Metaphor in Context
By the daily harangues and invectives against illegal usurpations, not only the house of commons inflamed themselves with the highest animosity against the court: The nation caught new fire from the popular leaders, and seemed now to have made the first discovery of the many supposed disorders in the government. While the law, in several instances, seemed to be violated, they went no farther than some secret and calm murmurs; but mounted up into rage and fury, as soon as the constitution was thought to be restored to its former integrity and vigour. The capital especially, being the seat of parliament, was highly animated with the spirit of mutiny and dissaffection. Tumults were daily raised; seditious assemblies encouraged; and every man, neglecting his own business, was wholly intent on the defence of liberty and religion. By stronger contagion, the popular affections were communicated from breast to breast, in this place of general rendezvous and society.
(p. 294)
Provenance
Reading
Citation
Hume's history was published 1754-1762. Over 45 entries in the ESTC (1762, 1763, 1764, 1766, 1767, 1769, 1770, 1771, 1772, 1773, 1775, 1778, 1780, 1782, 1786, 1788, 1789, 1790, 1791, 1792, 1793, 1795, 1796, 1797). [Published in 1754 as The History of Great Britain. Vol.I. Containing the Reigns of James I. and Charles I. The first volumes published became the last of the six in chronological ordering of the 1762 multi-volume work.]

See The History of England, from the Invasion of Julius C├Žsar to the Revolution in 1688. in Six Volumes. By David Hume, a New Edition, Corrected. (London: Printed for A. Millar, in the Strand, M DCC LXII, 1762). <Link to ESTC>

See David Hume, The History of England from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution in 1688, Foreword by William B. Todd, 6 vols. (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 1983). <Link to OLL> <Link to ECCOgt;
Date of Entry
02/05/2011

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.